asia trips 1 to 51 india 1-3 1984-2004; indonesia 4-7 (1982-1994) singapore 8-10 (1982-1992) japan (11-17) 1985-2013) thailand (18.19) 1984-1995 malaysia (20-21) 1993 korea (22-23) 1990-2017 bangladesh (24-39) 2007-2018, dubai (40,41) qatar(42) china (43-50) 2016-2019 hong kong 51 (1996) like 7 members of my scotttish family tree i have enjoyed the huge privilege of learning more about advancing the human lot from the two thirds who are asian than my own race caucasian
...united ; ASIA/MIDDLE EAST: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh & women, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Cyprus, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, North Korea, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon/yemen, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore-Asean, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, -eurasia, Russia- we list twice because most of its land is in asia but traditionally its capital and history is categorised as european....Mapping livelihood economics of two thirds of humans- in 1983 london scot james wilson started the economist as a newsletter of royal societies chattering classes- his initial goal ro end poverty and starv=ation in scotland and nearest islands london ruled over- 17 years later queen victoria sent wilson to calcutta with charter bank to end poverty wherever britain ruled over asia; sadly james died 9 months after landing of diarrhea; it took another 120 years before bangladesh, china and unicef taught every village mother how to cure diarrhea with a recipe of water sugar and salts; from this first open source health service, a billion women across the continent spent 1970-2020 ending extreme poverty - with the help of universities who knew fazle abed vest, at www.abedmooc.com we track how/why the world used bangladesh as its lab for solutions that worked without access to electricity or any of the engineering that glasgow gave to the world from 1760; some people ask what happened to the economist mission- you can read 2nd editor walter bagehot's attempts to help victoria journey to commowealth at the english constituition; but progress was to slow to prevent the colonial eara where whites 15% designed world trade to exclude most of human development in the economist's 1943 centenary biography; at that tie my dad was teenage navigator in alied bomber command stationed in modrnday myanma; the east end of the bay of bengal opposite to calcutta's west end; what happened next to bay of bengal - yuo'd thnk kamala harris and berkeley let alone howard alumni would urgenrly follow coming from her mothers'schennai- in a hasty retreat from responsibility anywhere the british raj had rlued -india eas partioned; calcutta the superport of asoa's 19th century was assigned to india; the rest of the bay was given to pakistan to rule; it took 24 years for bangladeshi people to win back indepenence now the 8th most populous nation with less than zero capital; my father norman macrae mapped varios asian economic models from 1962 when he first surveyed hs war time foe japan - he named the model poorest villagers would need to network rural kensianism; while he named the win-win supercity/port model of tokyo capital belt roadtsrs; for the next 30 years those who saw the economist as the first viewspaper for debating globalisation exponentials were trewed to regular updates on every asian peoples progess or not in sharing these new economic modelsSustainability's last chance decade: Feb 2021 2025report.com 37th annual update- economistpoor.com - thanks to hard work of asian motherhood, one billion asians have ended extreme poverty in the last 40 years - research shows human development's greatest lesson is not yet a curriculum in any western university -can you help adamsmith.app change economists before year end summits in Glasgow 1 2 & Dubai -try applying Economist alphabet Ai Bank Child Diary Edu Food Green Health Inclusion ..my scottish family's concern for development of two thirds of humans who are Asian goes bac 150+ years to founding of the pharmacy kemp's corner in mumbai to grandad's sir kenneth kemp's 25 years of mediation with gandhi leading to sir ken's last project wrining up the legalese of india's independence to my father's 40 years reporting asia's sustainability entrepreneurial revolution in The Economist; to his last article 20 years later on lessons from bangladesh needed to rectify the west's subprime disaster: japan's ambassador to dhaka helped aspiring youth journalists and others listen to sir fazle abed legacy debriefs - see our catalogue abed.games offering the most vital alumni networks youth can linkin if they are to celebrate being the first sustainability generation REFERENCES UN ENVOY EDUCATION -asia has proven to be greates champion of former uk prime minister Gordon brown -10 years un envoy edu links include A 1 2 lots of moving parts - some are very radical empowering new universities and apprenticeships - I have been tracking the for 5 years since being at un launch 2016 - can try and help with queries chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - if real summits return end 2021 hope to unite updates cop26 nov Glasgow and worlds largest edu summit allied to uae expo dec -meanwhile zooms can make connections
..

Friday, December 31, 1971

this world tour was updated for ineteconomics summer school at unctad in geneva zoomed between 8/152020 and 8/23/2020 -related summer school 2019

we blerd 2 parts - questions on experience to date of a place's valuation of youth - these are interpersonal /exploratory/seeking to map from multiple viewpoints diaspora scots have encountered from work in over 100 countries-   if you wish to interact them with norman macrae family foundation please chat with chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk who can also offer you readings from 1943 taken from our family's diary and journalism eg that of norman macrae at the economist- new questions going forward- obviously the student and teacher year 20-21 is the hardest in living memory duvid and other crises elders politics have reached

1 switzerland - i have been to unctad geneva twice in last 3 years-with much nimbler vienna now ban ki-moon alumni hub, geneva is the world forum for trade and health negotiations, unctad's value chain maps including its appointment of jack ma as tech youth world connector, where billionnaires who own telecoms meet itu, world economic forums, nuclear arms ; i also see that the biggest global sports value chains eg olympics, fifa are led out of switzerland, hi net income banking as well as rules of global pharma and global banking- there is also nestle's impact on value chains of eg coffee, chocolate, milk- what else? unctad speakers : richard kozul-wright

2 new york - the hq of un and  ysl, the linkages between soros global board of open society, his networks of economic experts, his 30+ OSUN youth college coalition as well as his own investment fund
2a africa's hq of un is kenya unhabitat and a satellite at addis abba now thats african union main hub
2b i have always been confused why thailand is where un chooses to represent the two thirds of our species who are asian

3 oxbridge - see sunday first oxbridge speaker is from my alma mate cambridge not my wife's oxford- oxford is on a roll as a leader in [vaccines ]https://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgIDgzKrRrwkM)and ethics mediator of china's tsinghua and us'mit in humaniSIng ai- aka schwarzman global scHolars

4 south africa - i am very confused where alumni of mandela linkin- perhaps fiona tregeena can shed light i used to know the connector of mandela, branson elders and the new university and mandela extranet taddy blecher but it seems that older politics has once again dominated as well as the fact that south africa isnt on world trade routes the way it was until the suez canal; meanwhile its got the blessing and curse of its huge mines of gold and diamonds- i wonder what gandhi would have thought of his 15 years of trying to triangularise a post colonial world mediating mumbai, durban and london-

india- my maternal grandfather as mumbai's chief justice mediated with gandhi over 2 decades- sir ken's last project ordered by london was writing up
legalese of independence of india subcontinent - how is india doing in ending poverty and mediating faiths- can jayati ghosh nehru uni tell us? the last time i went to india 2004- indira gandhi culture centre close to parliament was hosting 1000 gandhians discussing global reconciliation- there were a lot of ideas to write up but the next week the tsunami fit so that never happened 

india- my maternal grandfather sir kenneth kemp as mumbai's chief justice mediated with gandhi over 2 decades- sir ken's last project ordered by london was writing u[ legalese of independence of india subcontinent 


i will try and update this world tour , WELCOME ANY CORRECTIONS,
as well as improve a listing of [twitter accounts](https://twitter.com/i/lists/1294590126761353221) - welcome co-connectors chris macrae

Program of Events
Note: The time schedule is expressed in Central European Summer Time (CEST)
Saturday 15
2 – 2:30 pm Introduction - Young Scholars Initiative (Link to Attend)
Description: The session is specifically curated for the participants of the Summer School to introduce them to the Young Scholars of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET-YSI) and the UNCTAD Summer School 2020. During the session, we will briefly touch upon the structure of the Summer School and the technical modalities of the online platform. We will also present the details of the mentorship program and the blogpost writing competition. We will also use this session to address any other general or technical queries that the participants might have. Finally, we will also discuss ways in which the participants can be involved with the activities of INET-YSI beyond the Summer School.
Sunday 16
1 pm Welcome, Presentation of the School and Opening Keynote: “Why Do We Need to Transform Economics and How Do We Do It?” (Link to Attend)
Richard Kozul-Wright (UNCTAD)
Keynote Address: Jayati Ghosh (Jawaharlal Nehru University)
Debunking Myths Session: Myths About International Trade and Competitiveness (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Richard Kozul-Wright (UNCTAD)
2.30 pm Ha-Joon Chang (University of Cambridge)
3.45 pm Fiona Tregenna (University of Johannesburg)
Description: International trade theory has a vaunted place in the economics canon and its abiding notion of comparative advantage lies behind the one-size-fits all policy advice to liberalize as the assured way for countries to integrate beneficially into the global economy. In reality, international trade relations have always been structured around asymmetric patterns of dominance, economies of scale and technological learning and successful economies
have rarely embraced a simple policy of rapid tariff reductions. This opening session will provide an introduction to the debates around international trade and its place in today hyperglobalised world economy.
Monday 17
Debunking Myths Session: Myths About Monetary Policy, Inflation Targeting and Central Bank Independence (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Nurlan Jahangirli (University of Hamburg, YSI)
2 pm Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva)
3.30 pm Matias Vernengo (Bucknell University)
Description: Much of the pro-growth policy effort deployed in the past 10 years relied on the action of the central banks. The possible continuation of this framework in the Covid-19 crisis calls once again into question the actual capacity of conventional and unconventional monetary policy to trigger and reinforce a recovery, the fitness of the international monetary architecture to guarantee stability and, more broadly, the political role – both nationally and internationally – of central banks.
Tuesday 18
2 pm Thematic Symposium: What Green New Deal Can We (Not Not) Afford? (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Diana Vivienne Barrowclough (UNCTAD)
Richard Kozul-Wright (UNCTAD)
Juan Carlos Moreno Brid (National Autonomous University of Mexico-UNAM)
Juliet Schor (Boston College)
Description: The pandemic demanded a high human death toll, and it challenged the organization of our economies and lifestyles. But another looming disaster menaces our very own survival: the climate crisis. What can we and must we do about it? Is there a conflict between green economy, and development and full employment policies? What are the current challenges across the world? What is politically feasible?
Wednesday 19
Debunking Myths Session: Myths About Fiscal Policy and Structural Reforms (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Orsola Costantini (UNCTAD)
2 pm Nelson Barbosa (Sao Paulo School of Economics)
3.30 pm Jan Kregel (Levy Economics Institute of Bard College)
Description: Committing to do “whatever it takes” amounted to admitting that anything is possible. In front of evidence of past failure, is it still possible for policymakers to justify fiscal austerity and the compression of the living standards of the largest share of the population? What are the main relevant economic concepts at play and what are the practical challenges in designing a fiscal policy?
Thursday 20
2 pm Thematic Symposium: The Growth of China (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Yuefen Li (South Centre)
Kevin Gallagher (Boston University)
Arkebe Oqubay (Government of Ethiopia)
Justin Yifu Lin (Peking University)
Description: China has emerged as a global political and economic power, but just how strong is its model and what will its implications be in the post -pandemic?
Friday 21
2 pm Thematic Symposium: Discrimination and Intersectionality: Exposing the Blind Spots of Conventional Economics and Policy-Making (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Surbhi Kesar (Azim Premji University, YSI)
Elissa Braunstein (Colorado State University)
Naila Kabeer (London School of Economics)
Rhonda V. Sharpe (Women’s Institute for Science, Equity, and Race)
Description: Very few economists would argue that discrimination should persist. But the interpretation of the nature of the problems is just as divisive as the suggestion of appropriate policies.
Saturday 22
2 pm Thematic Symposium: The Future of Work, the Future of Welfare (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Piergiuseppe Fortunato (UNCTAD)
Deborah James (Center for Economic and Policy Research CEPR)
Ipek Ilkkaracan (Istanbul Technical University- ITU)
Guy Standing (SOAS University of London)
Description: Experts have been denouncing the dualism and inequality in the labor market both in the developed and in the developing countries. The current crisis has both intensified and transformed those tensions. How does the future of labor look like, and how can governments respond and adapt welfare institutions? What choices are they likely to make?
Sunday 23
2 pm Concluding Debate: Neoliberalism is Dead. Long Live…What? (Link to Attend)
Moderator: Grace Blakeley (International Progressive Policy Review-IPPR)
Jayati Ghosh (Jawaharlal Nehru University)
Gerald Epstein (University of Massachusetts, Amherst-UMass)
Surbhi Kesar (Azim Premji University, YSI)
Rob Davies (Ex-Minister, Trade and Industry, South Africa)
Quinn Slobodian (Wellesley College)
Description: The effort deployed by governments during and after the lockdown led observers to claim that globalization and the Neoliberal order, already shaky, have finally given way to a new state-driven nationalist model. While hopes for a new more equitable global system remain open, the dollar has proven to remain soundly at the top of the international monetary hierarchy. Similarly, the power of big financialized corporations does not seem to diminish, nor previous geopolitical tensions around the world have disappeared.
How to Apply:
Deadline for applications: August 10th
UNCTAD summer school welcomes applications from young policy makers and scholars, as well as members of the diplomatic corps.
To apply to summer school please visit the application form.
Contact information
For specific inquiries, please contact: gul.unal@un.org or development@youngscholarsinitiative.org
General Information
The school is jointly organized by the Division on Globalization and Development Strategies at UNCTAD and the INET-Young Scholars Initiative.
Organizers information
UNCTAD
UNCTAD is a permanent intergovernmental body established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1964. The organization is governed by its 194 member States and is the United Nations body responsible for dealing with economic and sustainable development issues with a focus on trade, finance, investment and technology. It helps developing countries to participate equitably in the global economy. UNCTAD carries out economic research, produces innovative analyses and makes policy recommendations to support government decision-making.
Division on Globalization and Development Strategies at UNCTAD
The Division promotes policies at the national, regional and international level that are conducive to stable economic growth and sustainable development. It regularly examines the trends and prospects in the world economy, undertakes studies on the requirements for successful development strategies and on the debt problems of developing countries. It also provides technical support to developing countries in their efforts to integrate into the international financial system and to manage their external debt.
INET- Young Scholars Initiative
YSI is an international community comprised of students, young professionals, and researchers. It provides a home to students, young professionals, or others who embrace new and critical ways of thinking about the economy. YSI fosters conversation between like-minded peers and connects young scholars to the Institute’s vast network of economists. YSI provides a platform for pursuing your interests in new economic thinking and a lively and stimulating intellectual environment for collaborating on furthering our understanding of the economy. The goal is for every member to be able to follow their curiosity and find resources and support for their specific intellectual pursuits in the overall community effort.

appendix 0 list of nations -please note we are simply mapping way a traveler might, we are not
smart enough to do any thing more

NORTH AMERICA: Canada, Mexico, United States
MIDDLE AMERICA: Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent & the Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago
SOUTH AMERICA: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela
EUROPE: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican City
ASIA/MIDDLE EAST: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh & women, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Cyprus, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, North Korea, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon/yemen, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore-Asean, Sri Lanka, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vietnam,  -Russia- we list twice because most of its land is in asia but traditionally its capital and history is categorised as european
AFRICA: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo (Democratic Republic of), Congo (Republic of), Cote d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, São Tomé & Príncipe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe
OCEANIA: Australia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau (Belau), Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu


appendix1
unctad twitter lists